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Windows 10 fails to boot, then it reboots, bizarre self-fix



 
 
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  #31  
Old November 2nd 18, 07:48 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
RayLopez99
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Posts: 860
Default Windows 10 fails to boot, then it reboots, bizarre self-fix

On Monday, October 15, 2018 at 2:30:59 PM UTC+8, Flasherly wrote:
On Sun, 14 Oct 2018 21:49:17 -0700 (PDT), RayLopez99
wrote:

Thanks to you and Flasherly.

Thread closed: cause was motherboard failure (gradual) so eventually
the Mobo failed to recognize the drive.

Will shop for another laptop mobo, maybe a Egghead? Ship in here from
the USA and 1-2 months later the laptop will be operational.

-
Egghead, that was before it was renamed NewEgg. You're going back
twenty years to Egghead, the name from a student in a college
dormitory running it, who started and then sold it, when it became
Newegg, not long before the biggest parts supplier in America. Amazon
has now taken that away by keeping guaranteed free shipping returns on
hardware, whereas Newegg will charge shipping for returns. That policy
can vary, but Amazon still averages a better chance for a free
shipping return in case of dissatisfaction. As computers became more
popular people, some, began to abuse return policies -- buy a laptop,
use it for 30 days, then return it and say because it's not good
enough.

I wouldn't pay over $200US for a laptop now. And I'd expect it to be
reasonably good, overall in performance, storage, screen size, for
that money. To a degree a subjective sense of efficiency also subject
to ability;- Intel successors to the ATOM kick butt at 2+ GHz, while
rated operationally for a 10-watt draw. All that's is somewhat niche,
too. Not the proverbial kitchen-sink assembled desktop with a
built-in garbage disposal to boot.



Thanks Flasherly. I did order from "NewEgg" a very cheap, probably used, mobo (I'm not sure if the mobo has a uP chip embedded in it, or whether you have to pull the microprocessor from the old board out, put thermal paste on it, and push it into the new mobo, but I'll find out) right around Oct. 15, and I'll had it shipped by a friend and it will be received in about a month or two. Much to my surprise and amusement, one PC shop said they don't know how to pull a chip off a mobo and reseat it onto a new board, but they do all kinds of other repairs they assured me (LOL; in a pinch I could buy a chip puller and do it myself, but I did finally find a guy that told me he can do it for about $25, which for him is a lot of money but not for me). The guys that used to run a PC shop here that once repaired my laptop for a fluid spill (my cute gf is a total klutz, very common btw with pretty girls) retired or went out of business (global demand is flator down for PCs so maybe that's why) and nowadays the salespeople only want to sell you a new PC. Such noobs. It's almost as bad as the smart phone business here in the Philippines, where you get mugged every time you walk into the 'electronics' section of a mall, by salespeople all clueless but trying to get you to buy a new phone. They don't know the difference between RAM, DRAM, internal, external memory but the better ones, that are not mere cute girls (promo models who literally know nothing or next to nothing--they always have a technical guy standing near them to answer questions--about the object they are promoting, and are there just for eye candy) will know how to do something (like transfer photos from internal to external memory) if you explain what you want to do in simple words, but they don't know the difference between a processor and memory, and so on, and will tell you things like "always buy a camera with the most pixels as it takes the best photo" (which may even be true, as a general rule of thumb). Such is life in the 21st century. I predict the next big thing will be a small monthly guaranteed income for these type people, paid by the people who still work and have jobs, as these type people don't know how to do anything except mouth breath and reproduce. I sound like the grumpy old man I've become! LOL, bye.

RL
  #32  
Old November 3rd 18, 12:49 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,173
Default Windows 10 fails to boot, then it reboots, bizarre self-fix

On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 11:48:52 -0700 (PDT), RayLopez99
wrote:


Thanks Flasherly. I did order from "NewEgg" a very cheap, probably
used, mobo (I'm not sure if the mobo has a uP chip embedded in it, or
whether you have to pull the microprocessor from the old board out,
put thermal paste on it, and push it into the new mobo, but I'll find
out) right around Oct. 15, and I'll had it shipped by a friend and it
will be received in about a month or two.

-
Won't know until it comes, and then you'll have to figure it out for
replacement and compatability. Newegg can help, one of the better,
although it's now a much broader market than what Newegg was before.

Selected a SSD drive the other day and am also waiting on delivery.
More of 256G SATA3 TLC brandnames are coming into a price range at
under $40/US. I caught a 256 model on brief sale for $35, except it's
a newer MLC NAND build. It has something of a support presence for a
longer than usual 6-yr warranty, that being the MLC. TLC starts with
many budget drives at 40 terabyte rates and doubles that above a 128G
SSD as they get bigger. A 256G being 80 TBW, 512G 160 TBW and so on.
I've got double that, a 160 TBW estimated write-cycle for the expected
life of a 256G SSD, in better MLC NAND factoring.

Quite a difference between the last SSD drive I bought, years ago, a
256G Crucial MLC model for $125, and $35. This new one is also styled
after Crucial's present MLC model, using the same controller and NAND,
except it's a lot less money and without a DRAM buffer. The buffer
comes into play when re-mapping how, usually, the operating system is
written, physically expecting to address a traditional plattered HDD.
The buffer then being the equivalent in solidstate NAND everytime the
computer controllers make calls to read data on the disk. Without the
DRAM the drive then suffers performance on disk usage which are used
to store a lot of small files. That is, there will be conversely less
of a problem with fewer of large files to say the SSD were used for
archives.

In any event and however that works out. Like I said I'm also waiting
for delivery and need to plug it into a computer. That is a lot
potentially for very little money and hopeful ventures. It'll be my
3rd SSD in this computer if there are no problems, and still two empty
ports left of six SATA ports.
 




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