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spdif pins



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 26th 18, 07:15 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
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Default spdif pins

Somehow I can't see original message on google groups.

My question is simply about pins in this case 1 pin.

Is 1 pin connect to the wire or two ?

Usually there is a plus and minus when it comes to eletricity/electronics.

Looking at the cables there seems to be 1 pin and then something circular.

(If it wasn't for the damn pictures I would have no idea how many pins/wires actually run through these spdif cables.)

There is no textual description of the cables themselfes, how many wires do they contain ?!?!?!

Please explain how the pin on the motherboard is connect to cable... or pins in case there are two or multiple involved.

The wiki does not explain this.

I must:

1. First be sure how many pins are attached to the cable.

2. How many encoded signals travel over the cable.

3. The encoding used over the cable.

Why and how would there be 1, 2 or multiple signals.

Very vague description on wikipedia as far as I can tell.

Just need some simple yes/no answers to how this is supposed to work.


"
S/PDIF (Sony/Philips Digital Interface)[1][2] is a type of digital audio
"

does not answer my question.

"
interconnect used in consumer audio equipment to output audio over reasonably
"

does not answer my question.

"
short distances. The signal is transmitted over either a coaxial cable with RCA
"

does not answer my question.

"
connectors or a fibre optic cable with TOSLINK connectors. S/PDIF interconnects
"

does not answer my question.

"
components in home theatres and other digital high-fidelity systems.
"

does not answer my question.

"
S/PDIF is based on the AES3 interconnect standard.[3] S/PDIF can carry two
"

May have to look into AES3/

"
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/AES3
"

Very little information as well.

"
channels of uncompressed PCM audio or compressed 5.1/7.1 surround sound (such as DTS audio codec); it cannot support lossless surround formats that require greater bandwidth.[4]
"

Two ?!?!?!?!?!? How the **** does it do two over 1 wire ?!?!? Sounds weird...

Interleaving of samples ?!??!?!?

No explanation given so does not answer my question.

I rest my case for now.

Bye,
Skybuck.
  #2  
Old November 26th 18, 07:24 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
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Default spdif pins

Somebody else replied to my original as well will post it here too, bottom contains some info from my experiments with hdmi, positional sound, surround sound modes... etc... got everything working... for findings real below.... some interesting discovery made relating to 7 ch stereo/dynamic eq/volume vs true surround sound.

On 11/23/2018 11:38 PM, wrote:
Hello,

Take a look at this picture, it shows pins for audigy and x-fi elite pro soundblasters:

http://pinouts.ru/visual/gen/sb_audigy2_ad_ext.jpg

ascii version in case picture is no longer available:

2 40
....................
....................
1 39

pins seem to be numbered vertically from bottom to top 1, 2, then next column is probably 3 4 and so forth.

Not sure which pins would be important to make a custom cable.

pin 5 spdif 0 in

pin 9 spdif 0 out
pin 27 spdif 3 out
pin 29 spdif 1 out
pin 31 spdif 2 out

Which other pins would be important ?

It mentions these SPDIF output pins. 0,1,2,3

So that's 4 pins.

How many audio channels can travel over 1 pin ?

Also how would these be connected into a cable, should gnd be included or another other pins

What I am trying to figure out if the X-Elite Pro soundblaster is what I currently believe it is:

7.1 Surround Sound Analog outputs
5.1 Surround Sound Digital outputs

However if only 4 spdif pins available then how would it achieve 6 channels for 5.1 surround sound digital ?

I read somewhat 1 spdif connection via normal connectors/cables can carry two audio channels.


"
It can carry two uncompressed audio channels of up to 48kHz and 20/24
bits, depending. It doesn't have to carry uncompressed audio though,
it's just transmission protocol and data link layer standard. A single
SPDIF connection can carry a 5.1 surround audio stream if it's encoded
with something like DTS and compressed 4:1, and connected to something
that knows how to decode it
"

How does it carry two audio channels over this wire ?

What does the wire consists out of ?

Is it literally one wire ?

Or are there two ? A plus and a minus ? Where does there appear to be two metal things involved on the wire a pin and something circular... the circular is maybe ground ?

Does it interleave audio signals over the cable ?

So if there are four spdif pins on the x-fi then why the **** does it not support 7.1 spdif over these cables ?!

Seems like a delibrate design to limit this piece of hardware.

Apperently creative labs doesn't really believe or want to support 7.1 surround sound.

A custom made cable and plug might be able to carry 7.1 to the receiver.

Lot's of these units sold, so perhaps this is an interesting commercial endavouer if somebody can make it work.

Not sure if it's totally worth it.

I did complete my experiments with laptop and pc and receiver and speakers etc.

Got everything working they way I wanted.

Have not experiment with spdif but did experiment with hdmi.

There is a slight sound improvement over hdmi... but probably not worth all the effort.

The main reason why the laptop sounded better was probably the surround sound mode.

It was set to 7 ch stereo, which made it sound really loud... plus perhaps dynamic eq and dynamic volume was on on the receiver.

This probably caused 3d positions sounds which are very weak and normally not hearable suddenly hearable which was very interesting for warcraft frozen throne...

All kinds of sounds were noticeable... which would normally probably be too low volume...

So lot's of audio quality is actually being lost by 3D audio technology in games itself...

Not sure what... maybe footsteps... or special sound effects... kinda weird..

For now I like positional audio best for world of warships so will stick with HDP direct.

Another possibility is multi channel 7.1 which would allow audio processing like dynamic eq/volume but this makes it harder to tell how far enemies truely are... bit degrades the 3d position information a bit... cause of volume adjustments.

Thx for the reply.

Bye,
Skybuck.
  #3  
Old November 26th 18, 11:40 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,144
Default spdif pins

On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 22:15:59 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

2. How many encoded signals travel over the cable.

3. The encoding used over the cable.

Why and how would there be 1, 2 or multiple signals.

Very vague description on wikipedia as far as I can tell.


Here's an oscilloscope of clocked line-code data, Biphase Mark Code
(Differential Manchester encoding), on a 3MHz square wave. *Looks to
have quite a developmental career, dating back to floppy and earlier
(telemetric) algorithms.

https://electronics.stackexchange.co...-is-plugged-in

*
Differential Manchester is specified in the IEEE 802.5 standard for
token ring LANs, and is used for many other applications, including
magnetic and optical storage. As Biphase Mark Code (BMC), it is used
in AES3, S/PDIF, SMPTE time code, and USB PD. Many magnetic stripe
cards also use BMC encoding, often called F2F (frequency/double
frequency) or Aiken Biphase, according to the ISO/IEC 7811 standard.
Differential Manchester is also the original "frequency modulation"
(FM) used on "single-density" floppy disks, followed by
"double-density" modified frequency modulation (MFM), which gets its
name from its relation to FM, or Differential Manchester, encoding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differ...ester_encoding
  #5  
Old November 26th 18, 10:36 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,144
Default spdif pins

On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 11:49:35 -0500, Paul
wrote:

Somewhere, there has to be a declaration concerning
the format of the data.


Wiki has t hem.
  #6  
Old November 27th 18, 01:07 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
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Posts: 885
Default spdif pins

Flasherly wrote:
On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 11:49:35 -0500, Paul
wrote:

Somewhere, there has to be a declaration concerning
the format of the data.


Wiki has t hem.


Epanorama has always been a good source.

http://www.epanorama.net/documents/audio/spdif.html

Paul
  #7  
Old November 27th 18, 11:30 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
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Posts: 2,144
Default spdif pins

On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 19:07:46 -0500, Paul
wrote:

Epanorama has always been a good source.

http://www.epanorama.net/documents/audio/spdif.html


I hadn't noticed either that AES conventions are named after my
speakers, a pair of Alesis monitors, until yesterday.
 




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