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Sandy Bridge SATA degradation flaw



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 30th 18, 01:26 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
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Posts: 163
Default Sandy Bridge SATA degradation flaw

The 67 chipsets SATA (3 Gbps) ports were supposed to fail over time.
I still have several PCs with 67 chipsets. I don't know what stepping
they are (old or fixed).
So how to tell? Would plugging in an SSD and doing a large file
benchmark diagnose a sickly chipset?
  #2  
Old November 30th 18, 02:39 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
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Posts: 885
Default Sandy Bridge SATA degradation flaw

wrote:
The 67 chipsets SATA (3 Gbps) ports were supposed to fail over time.
I still have several PCs with 67 chipsets. I don't know what stepping
they are (old or fixed).
So how to tell? Would plugging in an SSD and doing a large file
benchmark diagnose a sickly chipset?


The part numbers are here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_chipsets

"degrade over time until they become unusable" === ref. SATA port

SLH84(B2) (Recalled)
SLJ4C(B3)

SLH82(B2) (Recalled)
SLJ49(B3)

If the top of the chip has no heatsink, you might
read the part number off the top. The SLxxx value.

Only the first batch of boards had the B2 part, and
since Intel was paying the bill, those boards could
be recalled from the stores.

You can see the SLH84 on this one. Printed right on the chip.

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimages...67Aud7_P67.jpg

The recalled one is likely "Revision 1" while the
fixed one would be a higher Revision number. Use a copy
of CPUZ. This picture is intended to demonstrate the principle
of what field to check. This is *not* a picture of an H67 system.
But it does show a revision field number, which can be used to
figure it out, if you cannot gain access to the SLxxx number.

https://i.postimg.cc/yYX6R1W7/cpuz.gif

HTH,
Paul
 




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