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How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 18, 05:04 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Charlie Hoffpauir
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?
  #2  
Old October 11th 18, 06:04 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,082
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 11:04:24 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir
wrote:

I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


  #3  
Old October 11th 18, 06:53 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,082
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 13:04:39 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 11:04:24 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir
wrote:

I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


Excuse the blank missive. Maybe should have got the rounded keycaps
-- this keyboard can be a little "too mini" sometimes, a little "too
fast" at others.

W10 cloned to the Samsung SSD with no problems, thus and not only W10
was cloned OK, as well OK because W10 now comes up in an operational
state on the Samsung. Because your, per se, "cloning software" and
not your operational system software, now sees the Intel SSD and its
W10 content in duplicity, somehow then to surmise an illegal state, in
conjunction and while the Samsung W10 OS performs to function in
legitimate status.

I'll go out on the limb on this: Simply take your USB flashstick --
with all its "Live" OS variants, a definitive *NX OS partitioning
suite, mini-Windows, several iterations of HIRENs -- all ruled and
contained from a live flashstick root boot menu. Select the
partitioning suite, or simpler, to engage the offending partition on
the Intel and delete it.

You have of course prepared yourself such a flashstick, formerly a CD
"builders guide", for this invaluable contingency, yes and but of
course?

Another and personal approach I like is from the SDDs, themselves, by
laying into their MBR another "Boot Menu", similar to GRUB, but an
earlier and less-endowed *NIX variant. Through which, I'm able to
interact, on a partition level, according to which selections are
present, according as to how partitions will be then seen, while not
defined to a hidden state. Anything above Windows XP, however, will
not in the least like these shenanigans -- hence several SATA storage
devices, some with a MBR boot inlay, others, such as W7+ decidedly
..not. -- variously and still accessible viz an appropriate USB
flashdrive or alternative SATA Device boot BIOS selection.

Another approach you may try is to switch the Intel partition
containing W10 into a hidden status;- if not already partitioned, it
may be possible to create and contain it discretely, then, within one,
rather than elect to engage an effective and destructive reformat.
Results may of course vary, to include those not necessarily and least
of all anticipated.

But, what other reason can it be, than that is why there are software
"Builders Tools", besides industry computer or MSFT standards, for
testing where they might diverge from sole proprietary operations to
coincide.
  #4  
Old October 11th 18, 07:46 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
John Doe[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 432
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:

I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


Use Windows 10 boot media (disk/USB) to erase the drive.
  #5  
Old October 11th 18, 08:21 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 803
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as theboot drive?

Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:
I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


There might have been a way to change the disk identifiers
during the cloning operation.

If the disk identifiers clash, Disk Management will put
one of them "offline".

If you connect only the drive with the problem to
the computer, then use the Macrium ReflectFree emergency
boot CD, it has a "boot repair" option which has a tick
box to change disk identifiers. Once you run that on the
troublesome drive, plugging both drives in before
booting up again, should result in both being "online" again.
Then you can do anything you want with the drives,
even alternate booting between them if you want.

*******

In Macrium, if you clone a disk as a one-shot deal - that
allows Macrium to see it is a boot drive, and Macrium offers to
fix things up during the clone.

If you're a clever individual, and you "copy" one partition
at a time with Macrium (using it as a Partition Manager),
then the dis-ambiguation code doesn't run in Macrium. And
the copied partitions have all the original identifiers.
Now, you're in a mess (you can ask me some time how I
know this :-( ). Now it's time to boot the Emergency Boot CD
and fix it from the Boot Repair menu item.

Now you know why it takes me hours to do stuff.
I'm "always learning".

Paul
  #6  
Old October 11th 18, 08:23 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Charlie Hoffpauir
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 13:53:27 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 13:04:39 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 11:04:24 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir
wrote:

I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


Excuse the blank missive. Maybe should have got the rounded keycaps
-- this keyboard can be a little "too mini" sometimes, a little "too
fast" at others.

W10 cloned to the Samsung SSD with no problems, thus and not only W10
was cloned OK, as well OK because W10 now comes up in an operational
state on the Samsung. Because your, per se, "cloning software" and
not your operational system software, now sees the Intel SSD and its
W10 content in duplicity, somehow then to surmise an illegal state, in
conjunction and while the Samsung W10 OS performs to function in
legitimate status.

Actually the clone software (HDClone) never sees the Intel. I looked
at Windows , disk Management and noted that it won't recognize that
the Intel exists because it's a duplicate of the Samsung, so any Win
10 software won't see the Intel.
I'll go out on the limb on this: Simply take your USB flashstick --
with all its "Live" OS variants, a definitive *NX OS partitioning
suite, mini-Windows, several iterations of HIRENs -- all ruled and
contained from a live flashstick root boot menu. Select the
partitioning suite, or simpler, to engage the offending partition on
the Intel and delete it.

Nope, don't have that. I probably have an old *nix CD or DVD around
somewhere from experimenting years ago, but even if I found it I
probably wouldn't remember enough to be able to delete the partition.
You have of course prepared yourself such a flashstick, formerly a CD
"builders guide", for this invaluable contingency, yes and but of
course?

As mentioned later, a CD repair disk and Win 10 installation DVD.
Another and personal approach I like is from the SDDs, themselves, by
laying into their MBR another "Boot Menu", similar to GRUB, but an
earlier and less-endowed *NIX variant. Through which, I'm able to
interact, on a partition level, according to which selections are
present, according as to how partitions will be then seen, while not
defined to a hidden state. Anything above Windows XP, however, will
not in the least like these shenanigans -- hence several SATA storage
devices, some with a MBR boot inlay, others, such as W7+ decidedly
.not. -- variously and still accessible viz an appropriate USB
flashdrive or alternative SATA Device boot BIOS selection.

Another approach you may try is to switch the Intel partition
containing W10 into a hidden status;- if not already partitioned, it
may be possible to create and contain it discretely, then, within one,
rather than elect to engage an effective and destructive reformat.
Results may of course vary, to include those not necessarily and least
of all anticipated.

well, since I can't access the Intel SSD from Win 10 (unless I install
it instead of the Samsung), I really don't see a way to hide or remove
the partition.
But, what other reason can it be, than that is why there are software
"Builders Tools", besides industry computer or MSFT standards, for
testing where they might diverge from sole proprietary operations to
coincide.

I do have a Win 10 installation DVD, as well as a repair disk. I'll
boot from one of those and see if there is an option to format or
erase the SSD (I'll replace the Samsung with the Intel for this
exercise).

Thanks for the suggestions.
  #7  
Old October 11th 18, 08:31 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Charlie Hoffpauir
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 15:21:45 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:
I have an Intel SSD that was my old boot drive on my system. I cloned
it to a new Samsung SSD with no problems. However, since the operating
system is still on the old Intel, my software won't recognize it to
use it as a cloned backup of the new Samsung SSD. So how do I remove
the operating system, when Win 10 won't recognize the Intel because it
conflicts with the operating system on the Samsung?


There might have been a way to change the disk identifiers
during the cloning operation.

If the disk identifiers clash, Disk Management will put
one of them "offline".

That's just what happens.

If you connect only the drive with the problem to
the computer, then use the Macrium ReflectFree emergency
boot CD, it has a "boot repair" option which has a tick
box to change disk identifiers. Once you run that on the
troublesome drive, plugging both drives in before
booting up again, should result in both being "online" again.
Then you can do anything you want with the drives,
even alternate booting between them if you want.

This sounds like the solution I need!
*******

In Macrium, if you clone a disk as a one-shot deal - that
allows Macrium to see it is a boot drive, and Macrium offers to
fix things up during the clone.

Unfortunately, I cloned using a hardware device that simply copies
everything over exactly the same. It certainly should do the same
thing again, since it operates "stand-alone" (not connected to a
computer), but after a couple of months, it seems to no longer work
($10.00 wasted on cheap chinese hardware).
If you're a clever individual, and you "copy" one partition
at a time with Macrium (using it as a Partition Manager),
then the dis-ambiguation code doesn't run in Macrium. And
the copied partitions have all the original identifiers.
Now, you're in a mess (you can ask me some time how I
know this :-( ). Now it's time to boot the Emergency Boot CD
and fix it from the Boot Repair menu item.

Now you know why it takes me hours to do stuff.
I'm "always learning".

Yeah, I used to do that, now I forget everything I learned the last
time I did something that took forever, so it takes me forever again.
One of the problems with 79.

Paul


  #8  
Old October 11th 18, 08:43 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,082
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as the boot drive?

On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 14:23:53 -0500, Charlie Hoffpauir
wrote:

Actually the clone software (HDClone) never sees the Intel. I looked
at Windows , disk Management and noted that it won't recognize that
the Intel exists because it's a duplicate of the Samsung, so any Win
10 software won't see the Intel.


Unless the drive partition containing the extra Windows is
emphatically hidden, in my experience, the valid Windows install will
fail to initialize - not even a "blue screen of death". Instantaneous
and full-throttle MSFT regurgitation.

Nope, don't have that. I probably have an old *nix CD or DVD around
somewhere from experimenting years ago, but even if I found it I
probably wouldn't remember enough to be able to delete the partition.


Indispensable...
https://www.hirensbootcd.org/hbcd-v150/
but I see they've also newer stuff I haven't gotten into. With a
flashstick boot arbitrator and (also contained) ISO conversion...
http://www.winsetupfromusb.com/files...omusb-1-4-exe/
then the ISOs or flashdrive's physical size is the key to sky's limit.
GPartEd is another ISO - Partition Ed and OS rolled into one;- also
have a base *nix OS imagery for some WEB connectivity if needed.

Fun if not eaten all at once for a headache.

well, since I can't access the Intel SSD from Win 10 (unless I install
it instead of the Samsung), I really don't see a way to hide or remove
the partition.


No proble-m-ento. Just takes climbing aways onto that limb to lop of
the thinner stuff, slow and easy, and some practice with safe
partition manipulation.

I do have a Win 10 installation DVD, as well as a repair disk. I'll
boot from one of those and see if there is an option to format or
erase the SSD (I'll replace the Samsung with the Intel for this
exercise).


May work.
  #9  
Old October 12th 18, 12:20 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 803
Default How to clone from a current SSD to one previously used as theboot drive?

Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:


Unfortunately, I cloned using a hardware device that simply copies
everything over exactly the same.


Well, that's your problem right there.

The disk identifiers cannot help but be identical
if a hardware copier does the job.

https://i.postimg.cc/G9wg2D97/signature-collision.gif

https://i.postimg.cc/rF5M9CGp/collis...d-diskpart.gif

Method:

1) Administrator command prompt

2) diskpart

list disk

select disk 1 # the Offline one

uniqueid disk id=11AA22CC # different formats for MBR vs GPT disks...
# this is for MBR disk, GPT needs UUID format

online disk # Puts disk 1 online again.

3) Close and open "Disk Management" and
verify it is online. Correct drive letters
on the second drive as you see fit (Disk Management
can be lazy about the letters).

Disk Management should now allow the old partitions
to be deleted, or, whatever.

So we don't need Macrium. Fortunately.

The trick was finding the word "signature" to use
in a search.

HTH,
Paul
 




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