A Computer hardware and components forum. ComputerBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ComputerBanter.com forum » General Hardware & Peripherals » Homebuilt PC's
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Make it Stop



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 16th 19, 06:31 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,189
Default Make it Stop

A connector, in the back of the computer, a little jiggling around
things, and do I really deserve all this?

The HDD transfer issues, I thought heat related, were not.

Uh-oh. Danger Will Rogers: HDD failure.

Tracked it down, in Windows' reports, to a "page issue", an incessant
slew of worsening errors. Page issue, though the swapfile wasn't per
se mentioned - if it looks and walks like a duck - then it's probably
the pagefile, then.

Kicked in the HDD's SMART, too, I'd imagine where there weren't any
errors, for a UDMA CRC firmware error condition. Which I have now.
Sort of.

Looked it over on the WEB -- sure why not -- let us commence to
cleaning up connectors. Used a hard pen eraser to clean the HDD SATA
connects and electrical parts cleaner to mate (reinsert a few times)
the HDD's connection with a new locking SATA cable.

That fixed it for back to smooth as silk data transfers. No more
system glitches and wackiness due to the swap file on a partition to
that particular drive.

Annoying though. See you buy a car with a computer, and it kicks out
a ROM code, maybe because you didn't change an air filter or top up
the oil. You fix the condition, reset the car's memory chip, and
merrily tool off to go about your business.

A HDD sticks it in there. Permanently. Maybe an advertising gimmick,
make you think imperfectly, look at that same reported error for the
rest of the HDD's life. Maybe the HDD manufacturer thinks you'll get
so tired of it, you'll buy another. Maybe because it's a "hard" drive
it needs "hard" errors, too.

Anyway, major code amber didn't escalate into red-alarm security data
issue, once I'd stuck that HDD into a docking station for better
electrical connections and watched it perform flawless.

Keep your and cables and HDD contacts clean if your computer HDD
activity light stays on too long and programs turn weird.
  #2  
Old April 16th 19, 11:10 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Filip454[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Make it Stop

W dniu 2019-04-16 o*19:31, Flasherly pisze:
A connector, in the back of the computer, a little jiggling around
things, and do I really deserve all this?

The HDD transfer issues, I thought heat related, were not.

Uh-oh. Danger Will Rogers: HDD failure.

Tracked it down, in Windows' reports, to a "page issue", an incessant
slew of worsening errors. Page issue, though the swapfile wasn't per
se mentioned - if it looks and walks like a duck - then it's probably
the pagefile, then.

Kicked in the HDD's SMART, too, I'd imagine where there weren't any
errors, for a UDMA CRC firmware error condition. Which I have now.
Sort of.

Looked it over on the WEB -- sure why not -- let us commence to
cleaning up connectors. Used a hard pen eraser to clean the HDD SATA
connects and electrical parts cleaner to mate (reinsert a few times)
the HDD's connection with a new locking SATA cable.

That fixed it for back to smooth as silk data transfers. No more
system glitches and wackiness due to the swap file on a partition to
that particular drive.

Annoying though. See you buy a car with a computer, and it kicks out
a ROM code, maybe because you didn't change an air filter or top up
the oil. You fix the condition, reset the car's memory chip, and
merrily tool off to go about your business.

A HDD sticks it in there. Permanently. Maybe an advertising gimmick,
make you think imperfectly, look at that same reported error for the
rest of the HDD's life. Maybe the HDD manufacturer thinks you'll get
so tired of it, you'll buy another. Maybe because it's a "hard" drive
it needs "hard" errors, too.

Anyway, major code amber didn't escalate into red-alarm security data
issue, once I'd stuck that HDD into a docking station for better
electrical connections and watched it perform flawless.

Keep your and cables and HDD contacts clean if your computer HDD
activity light stays on too long and programs turn weird.


Low HDD temperature is the biggest MYTH of computer world.

Temperature of your HDD should be quite high but not too high. Cold
drives tend to fail more often than drives who are kept around 50
degrees Celsius (sometimes even higher) can fail less much less often.

--
Filip454
]
  #3  
Old Yesterday, 04:13 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,189
Default Make it Stop

On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 00:10:40 +0200, Filip454
wrote:


Low HDD temperature is the biggest MYTH of computer world.

Temperature of your HDD should be quite high but not too high. Cold
drives tend to fail more often than drives who are kept around 50
degrees Celsius (sometimes even higher) can fail less much less often.


50*9/5
90+32
122

I don't personally like them that hot, although 115+F occasionally
does "happen" in the hot summers without A/C.

110F, under 110F and over 95F is to my liking. It's the only fans I
actually bother with since the equally mythical dawn, I suppose, of a
PC revolution. For me PC cases are now one step above, in the
convenience department, a plywood breadboard with some nails in it to
"strap up" a PC.

CPU fan. Fans go in contained PWR SUPPLY and still decent but hot
CPUs. They're the foremost obvious and above, for the one and only
case fan, in front of the HDD rack array, I personally wouldn't
operate without.

Never been a big fan of failing drives, either, whether or not they're
left in right toasty to crispy to grab aholt. Win some, lose some:
that's what a fanatic is. I stuck with Seagates, early $300 RRL 30Gs,
up until Maxtor's heyday contracts with the U.S. Dept. of Navy, few
IBMs, still cycling into some large T-byte class cheap Saumsungs from
the pre-typhoon devastation that hit the Pacific Rim manufacturing
facilities. Leaving Seagate and Western Digital's mainstream, as
they've been all along, among offerings as well these days. I pretty
much now favor a latter popularity to a rocksolid 5400 WD.

For a personal matrix, then, what I'm looking for is 10 years HDD life
expectancy. That's the better sort of luck, than not, I feel I have
had overall with HDD. Right tickles my fancy, it does, when drives up
and decide to last that long. (I've probably also owned enough failed
drives to hope the good memories aren't too biased against what would
have went, over time, over the shoulder.)

All that's left is up and coming larger capacity SSDs, an alternative
aspect, in their own right, to pure 2T+ drives with some time now, a
few years, to report improved reliability in select industry sectors,
with new physical platter tracking methodology employed for up to a
likes of 8T and a few 12T's. They occasionally do as well surface for
absurd sale prices, closer than not to $100, to be wondrous
considerations of sheer bulk capacity.

Not that I've studied them extensively enough for a better bias
towards a purchase;- I'm just kinda idling along, eyeballing the
$50-ish 512G SDD offerings. Might switch for some study time with
larger platter sizes and an aim to make killing a monstrosity a worthy
endeavor to attempt among better buys.
  #4  
Old Yesterday, 09:56 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,189
Default Make it Stop

On Tue, 16 Apr 2019 23:13:54 -0400, Flasherly
wrote:

Seagates, early $300 RRL 30Gs,

-
Correction: Those were 30 megabyte RLLs, or earliest entries for home
PC enthusiast's budget, ensuing after a more prohibitive MFM 20
megabyte hard disk, possibly $500.

People ran programs from out of a boxful of floppies with two 360Ks,
and a RF converter for outputing monochrome into a 5" portable
TeeVee;- They were staunch supporters of a coke-a-cola(tm) eye-glass
industry on global networks predating the WWW.

An RLL was plenty big for 5 or 10 megabyte of pre-Zip, LHA or ARJ,
all-night verification efforts promoted by a command switch, to do a
checksum on the integrity of the compressed programs, at 5 mega-hertz
with an 8088, NEC V20 or 30 (6 mega-hertz).

Once they were cold, a field computer box with an inverted keyboard
for a lid, was taken was out of the back of a pick-up bed in the dead
of winter, it had to warm up for half an hour. The RLL platters
needed to expand to room temperature to match the head-travel
tolerance to tracks at a temperature they were formerly written.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PC power on - start, stop, start, stop, etc - eventually powers up spodosaurus Homebuilt PC's 10 December 27th 08 02:55 PM
Filter Key::: Is it ON? Is it OFF? Please can someone just tell me how to make it STOP!! Roy Baldone Homebuilt PC's 2 February 25th 08 01:24 AM
How does one make use of sub files to make DVD? Bun Mui Cdr 2 May 21st 06 10:33 PM
How Do I Make HP LaserJet Stop Reprinting on Error? TC Printers 2 July 12th 05 02:55 AM
Please make it STOP! HP7110 all-in-one Petey the Wonder Dog Printers 1 April 5th 05 06:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 ComputerBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.